Sermon of the Slave

By KC

I refuse to be grounded
By the clock pounded
Instead I will fly as one with time
To be a legend and never die
I am self, the undeniable truth
Even though the masses deny my worth—
by denying my freedoms
I am self-bonded by Blood, Iron and Pain
Transported over seas and through time
A lifetime of hate created by ignorance from others—
and self-destruction within
But still I fight—still I rise
And one day I will be free

Comments

  1. KC,

    One word: powerful. Your poem captures the plight of African Americans throughout time in the U.S. with beautiful words. I also love that you refuse to let these injustices — past and present — keep you down. Perseverance is an amazing trait and I look forward to things you may write in the future.

  2. Dear KC,

    Thank you for sharing this beautiful poem. It is so well-written and moving. This poem serves as a reminder that even though slavery in the US is over, the effects of racism still exist. I love how you included the words of Maya Angelou: “still I rise”. This poem is both sorrowful and hopeful and an important read.

  3. Gabriella says

    I admire the message of strength and determination in this poem. What first caught my attention was the title. It is extremely powerful: “Sermon of the Slave”. The last two lines resonate with me; I hear your declaration of freedom.

  4. cora broadhurst says

    i love the passion behind this poem. My favorite line is “but still i fight- still i rise”. It really shows how determined you are to “not be grounded” and to be free. I wish you the best of luck.

  5. kassidilenae says

    KC,

    Thank you for sharing this poem with us. It is so strong and genuine. I love your use of the Maya Angelou quote “still I rise.” Continue to rise up against the injustice you face, encouraged that you are not alone.

    Keep writing!

  6. Your poem from a slave’s point of view sent chills through me. Slavery was awful and wrong, and I think you do a good job at highlighting the everyday internal fight of slaves. They were oppressed and at the same time they were doing their best to find ways to survive, live, and love under the circumstances they were forced into: “I refuse to be grounded / By the clock pounded… But still I fight—still I rise / And one day I will be free.” That, and this poem, rings true strength. Thank you for sharing this.

  7. Kc, great poem. I enjoyed the imagery in your poem.

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